Italy’s Northern League launches drive for power

Lega Nord supporters rally in front of Milan Cathedral

Contributed by Xavier Connolly

We are accustomed in our libertarian blogs, The Daily Stirrer and Boggart Blog, to mentioning the Five Star Movement led by Beppe Grillo whenever the topic of anti E U feeling in Italian politics is in the news. This is perhaps unfair to Italy’s oldest anti EU party, Lega Nord, (The Northern League,) led by the rising star of the Italian right Matteo Salvini.

While it is probably unfair to describe Lega Nord as ‘right wing’ (they are Libertarian) the party is a strong opponent of the cultural Marxism of European and American consensus politics.

One of the Northern League’s problems is that its founder, Umberto Bossi always pursued a separatist agenda, arguing that the highly industrialised north of Italy should split from the economically agrarian and politically conservative south. Thus the party was seen as a regional political force only.

Now however, The Northern League has launched a political campaign aimed at winning support in the southern regions, with a view to eventually forming a national government.

Though previous attempts to make the regional party a nationwide
force have failed, Lega Nord is gambling on Salvini’s popularity, his anti-immigration, anti-EU stance and the growing feeling that further integration of EU member states being demanded by Brussels threatens national sovereignty and cultural identity, to turn them into a national force.

“We will make it into power. I don’t know when, but we will get there,” Salvini told reporters at a press conference launching the campaign..

Party leaders said membership in the new effort is open to any Italian not already in office, though politicians’ bids to join the movement will also be considered on a
case-by-case basis.

Salvini said it is an attempt to avoid “recycling” certain politicians who may be hoping to take advantage of the party’s momentum, which is being spurred by his steadily growing popularity. (Now who do we think he could be referring to? Signor Berlusconi perchance?)

A recent poll ranked Salvini just behind Prime Minister Matteo Renzo on Italians’ list of favourite political leaders. His rise has been compared to Marine Le Pen, leader of the far-right National Front in France.
Salvini is a fan of Le Pen, who has softened the hard-right image of her party and broadened its appeal as voters across Europe have turned to pro-independence parties in a backlash against the Brussels bureaucracy and the economic gloom engulfing much of the euro zone.

RELATED POSTS:
Sweden Taxing Itself Into Oblivion Because Of Insane Immigration Policy
A Third Of Italian Voters Are Ready To Back Anti-immigrant Party
The Euro Is Closer To Collapse Than Anyone Cares To Admit.
Democracy: Does It have A Future Or Has Global Totalitarianism Won?

The Illiberal Left’s War On Western Culture

During the Cold War era, the Russians told a familiar joke: “Under Capitalism, man exploits man while under Communism, it’s the other way round.

Western culture is in trouble, I don’t think many reasonable people would disagree with that (if you think a totalitarian global government is kool you’re not reasonable, GTF out of here.) The Daily Stirrer has posted many items on the war on our traditions and values and so have other people, one such article is embedded here. Don’t assume those who defend our values are right wing, Hitler’s Nazis and Stalin’s Soviets tried to change culture by force, the true left, Britain’s Labour and Liberal parties in their great days and northern Europes’s Social Democrats and Christian Democrats have always defended it.

Don’t confuse either system with freedom (The Flight From Freedom)

Read more
Culture War

RELATED POSTS:
Labour, the (very rich, elitist) People’s party plans to ban your beer and pies

The Downfall Of The Working Class

Little Nicky is always pissed off when Labour voting neo – fascists accuse him of being a Tory because Little Nicky is and always has been way to the left of these Epsilon semi morons who think there is co contradiction in describing oneself as left wing and then supporting the authoritarian, big government solutions of the Marxist right.

Since the Labour movement in Britain was hijacked by middle class elitists in the 1930s, the party has always been to the right of the conservatives. To understand how I can say this and be right (Little Nicky is always right) you need to be politically and philosophically literate and if you vote Labour you’re not. End of story.)

Sadly the Lib Dems have now joined Labour is an area of the political spectrum that is somewhere between Genghis Khan and Atilla the Hun. There is no left any more, only the right and the oligarchic collectivist right.

Today those who think they are of “the left” are actually voting for their own enslavement, infantilization and the ascendency of a meritocratic elite in which Cameron and Miliband, Balls and Osborne are trough brothers (and Clegg is the class sissy they tolerate because he is useful). The elite want you to be dependent on government because absolute power gives them such a thrill in the groin area. Wake up!

Things are much the same in Obamaland. Here is an article I found on the collapse of the American working class.

?The working class epidemic of demoralization
While coastal elites overindulge, struggling Americans in flyover country feel they have little to live for or believe in
By Matt K. Lewis | December 11, 2012

I’ve written a lot this past year about the struggles of white, working-class communities. But nothing I have written will likely capture the desperation as completely as Anne Hull’s Washington Post column about a struggling young woman named Tabitha Rouzzo.

If you haven’t read it, you should. The column is remarkable, not just because it is interesting and well written, but also because it documents a phenomenon that has gone largely unnoticed and under-appreciated: The crushing burdens and near-impossible struggling of working-class white Americans.

It’s probably natural that this story would speak to me. I’m from rural western Maryland. My dad was a correctional officer. I’m a graduate of a small college in West Virginia. But few of my colleagues have a similar background (and the ones that do would just as soon forget it.) Many of our opinion leaders are, for obvious reasons, disconnected from “flyover” country.

This disconnect between supposed thought leaders and much of the country’s citizenry is problematic.

Good journalism requires investigating such trends and asking questions, such as: When did this slide start, and what is to blame?

As is often the case, the problem likely goes back to cultural changes that began in the 1960s — changes that eventually impacted small-town America.

A recent Vanity Fair article about “the Summer of Love” in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1967 provides some clues:

Nicholas von Hoffman, of The Washington Post, who covered the Haight in a suit and tie, was, he says [by 1967], “appalled” by what he saw….

The overnight change in the attitude toward drugs was what alarmed von Hoffman…

Now, suddenly, he continues, “middle- and working-class kids were doing ‘vice tours,’ like American businessmen in Thailand: coming to the Haight for a few weeks, then, when the dirt between their toes got too encrusted, going home. This was when American blue-collar and middle-class kids became drug users. This was the beginning of the Rust Belt rusting.”

This, I suppose, is an argument for the “no guardrails” theory — a theory that basically says the rich and famous can afford to live a bacchanalian existence, while those who emulate them pay the price.

A lifestyle of addiction, promiscuity, and chaos comes with a hefty price tag. Sadly, our elites are exporting those values to the people least capable of sustaining them. If you don’t believe me, just watch MTV.

Aside from the money in their bank accounts, the spoiled kids featured on My Super Sweet Sixteen aren’t terribly different from those featured in the trailer for MTV’s upcoming reality series Buckwild. The difference, of course, is that the West Virginia kids being glamorized in Buckwild will grow old before their time — if they live long enough to grow old, that is. Most will likely spend the rest of their lives paying for the sins of their youth. The rich kids, on the other hand — well, they will likely land on their feet.

Hull’s column demonstrates how bad moral decisions impacted Tabitha Rouzzo’s family. For example, of Rouzzo’s mom, Hull writes: “In her face and spirit were traces of the cheerleader who got pregnant in the eighth grade… They had two daughters and Tabi on the way when they split.”

Rick Santorum has popularized the notion that being married before having kids — and then staying married — is good for the pocketbook. When we mock social conservatives for their “family values,” we ought to remember the practical reason these values caught on.

Kids growing up in rural communities often face tremendous economic pressures and feel they have little to believe in. Many see little hope for their futures. They seem to lack a purpose in life, and humans need a purpose.

Cities offer their own challenges, of course, but they also have a different energy. They have museums, hustle, and bustle. Cities are where — as Matt Ridley says — “ideas have sex.” Small communities lack this energy. (The Hal Ketchum song “Small Town Saturday Night” notes that you “gotta be bad just to have a good time.”)

Of course, it would be wrong to assume this is all about values. Around the same time Hollywood started importing bohemian values to the heartland, our politicians began shipping jobs overseas — and waves of immigrants began pouring in.

This isn’t new. We are a few generations into this trend, now. But we are close enough to remember the old days and resent what has been stolen from us. As Hall writes, “Tabi heard stories about the olden days. She came from welders and ceramic production workers. But, to Tabi, the sprawling Shenango China factory where her grandfather and great-grandfather worked was just a boarded-up place on the way to Walmart.”

Economies change, and it would be wrong to suggest that we should use the forces of government to prevent this evolution. A free market demands that some businesses fail while others succeed. Towns also fail. Unfortunately, this means people fail. It would also be wrong of us not to acknowledge that there are real-life consequences to this “creative destruction.”

I recently ran across a New York Times story about golfing great Ben Hogan that puts a face on this phenomenon. As The Times notes, Hogan’s father, “a blacksmith put out of work by the spread of the automobile, had committed suicide, shooting himself while 9-year-old Ben looked on in horror.”

One can only imagine this is a fairly common story.

This is a topic that deserves the attention of our political leaders. And perhaps, it finally will get it. There seems to be a strong indication that many working-class whites in the rust belt simply couldn’t bring themselves to vote for Barack Obama or Mitt Romney. There is an opening for a political party to address these populist concerns. Will anyone answer the call?

Gang Culture

Not much doing today, we are gobsmacked by Blair’s latest “crackdown” on “gang culture.” Given the Home Office’s track record on goofing up this is fraught with potential hazards. For instance if someone is talking about a party or similar you might well ask “who was there?”
And they might well reply “Oh, just the usual gang.”
At which point the boys in blue would burst in and arrest everybody.