SSRIs: The Prescription Drug That Is More Dangerous Than Street Drugs

There are still some segments of society hung up on the issue of ending cannabis prohibition due to an unfounded fear that the seed-bearing plant is somehow a “gateway drug” that leads to a life of vice and crime. But the real gateway substances that we should all be worried about, and perhaps the ones with the most negative impact on society, are pharmaceutical drugs, and antidepressants like SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) in particular, which have been proven to lead to extreme depression, suicide and even mass murder.

A recent report by James Corbett of The Corbett Report unearths some of the extensive history of SSRI-induced suicides and homicides in America, drawing specific attention to a number of mass shootings that have occurred as a result of these drugs. Prozac, for instance, which is often prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), was responsible for triggering multiple mass shootings at schools during the 1990s and 2000s, while other SSRIs have been linked to similar shootings.

Continue Reading at Natural News: SSRIs: Gateway Drug To Mass Murder

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Cannabis and Common Sense

Following on from yesterday’s post about the apparent absence of common sense in the legal system, today we bring you news of another example of the inability of judges and lawyers to grasp reality.
Sixty – Eight year old Patricia Tabram of Hemshaugh, Northumbria was convicted at Carlisle Crown Court yesterday of possessing cannabis. She had admitted growing three plants in her wardrobe for self medication purposes. Mrs Tabram, who suffers from depression and arthritis mixes the dried, ground laves with various foods to lift her depression and give her respite from the chronic pain in her joints. She claims cannabis it the only therapy which works on her symptoms without causing debilitating side effects. A cup of hot chocolate containing a little cannabis gave her five hours relief from pain, the court was told.
Now this person who does not have much quality of life left nor much to look forward to in her remaining years is faced with the prospect of having to do 250 hours community service (with crippling arthritis, yeah right!) and pay £1000 legal costs. Because of the conviction her home in a sheltered unit provided by a Housing Association is also at risk.
In passing sentence Judge Barbara Forrester said she understood Mrs. Tabram only used the drug for self medication and had no intent to supply but the law limited the scope for leniency.
It has always been a principle of British justice (though too rarely observed in recent centuries when vengeance and retribution seem to be the only principles that matter) that justice should be tempered with compassion. If ever there was a case for a judge set a precedent in the interests of justice this was it.
Sadly, under the bureaucratic dictatorship set up by the bully Thatcher and expanded by the traitor and war criminal Blair, common sense is always overridden by rules and regulations. Judges seem ever more reluctant to give verdicts that challenge a bad law which does not distinguish between a crime and a misdemeanour because the government, which is jealous of the power of an independent judiciary, may use it as an excuse to further undermine that independence. This has led to many deplorable decisions by the dispensers of justice.
Another social commentator at an American website wrote last week of a “social recession” in the free world. It is hardly surprising. When those with the authority to do so are afraid to challenge bad laws, respect for the law breaks down. And when respect for the law breaks down we cease to be a society and become a rat pack.